Shall i compare thee to summers

Written in typical Shakespearean sonnet format, Sonnet 18 has 14 lines of iambic pentameter with a rhymed couplet at the end. But it would be a mistake to take it entirely in isolation, for it links in with so many of the other sonnets through the themes of the descriptive power of verse; the ability of the poet to depict the fair youth adequately, or not; and the immortality conveyed through being hymned in these 'eternal lines'.

As James Boyd-White puts it: This famous sonnet is on this view one long exercise in self-glorification, not a love poem at all; surely not suitable for earnest recitation at a wedding or anniversary party, or in a Valentine. Faults are pointed out- for example the weather in lines five and six the sun can be too hot at times.

This makes a poor comparison to his love because it is totally different too. For more on the theme of fading beauty, please see Sonnet The other important and less disgusting issue these lines bring up is the question of "thee.

For the moment, all we can really tell is this: He first published his poetry inaged 21 and he was married in the same year to Martha Turner, although he was still in love with his first girlfriend, Mary Joyce.

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? (Sonnet 18)

This, in combination with the words "nature's changing course", creates an oxymoron: Although much is known about his life, scholars are still uncertain as to whether or not Shakespeare actually authored his works, and convincing arguments exist on both sides.

Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Perhaps with a reference to progeny, and lines of descent, but it seems that the procreation theme has already been abandoned.

Or grave thy victory. The final two lines seem to corroborate this view, as it moves away from the description of the lover to point out the longevity of his own poem.

Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day? (Sonnet 18) by William Shakespeare

Summer, for example, is said to have a "lease" with "all too short a date. Both change and eternity are then acknowledged and challenged by the final line. Now, perhaps in the early days of his love, there is no such self-doubt and the eternal summer of the youth is preserved forever in the poet's lines.

Structure[ edit ] Sonnet 18 is a typical English or Shakespearean sonnethaving 14 lines of iambic pentameter: KDJ adds a comma after course, which probably has the effect of directing the word towards all possible antecedents.

It is noticeable that here the poet is full of confidence that his verse will live as long as there are people drawing breath upon the earth, whereas later he apologises for his poor wit and his humble lines which are inadequate to encompass all the youth's excellence. So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Theories about his death include that he drank too much at a meeting with Ben Jonson, and Drayton, contemporaries of his, contracted a fever, and died. Instead of musing on that further, he jumps right in, and gives us a thesis of sorts.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? (Sonnet 18): About the poem Sonnet 18 or "Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day" is one of the most acclaimed of all But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st; Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: The speaker starts by asking or wondering out loud whether he ought to compare whomever he’s speaking to with a summer’s day.

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Instead of musing on that further, he jumps right in, and gives us a thesis of sorts. Summary: Sonnet 18 The speaker opens the poem with a question addressed to the beloved: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” The next eleven lines are devoted to such a comparison.

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day Theme

SONNET 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd.

Shall i compare thee to summers
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Sonnet 18 - Wikipedia